Allison Kilkenny: Unreported

No More Excuses?

Posted in Barack Obama, Economy, politics, poverty, racism by allisonkilkenny on January 24, 2009

Charles M. Blow

black-childrenFor the presidential inauguration, blacks descended on Washington in droves with a fanatical, Zacchaeus-like need to catch a glimpse of this M.L.K. 2.0. “Ooo-bama!” For them, he was it — a game changer, soul restorer, dream fulfiller. Everything. Ooo-K.

Representative James Clyburn of South Carolina, the majority whip, tapped into the fervor Monday night at the BET Honors awards in Washington when he proclaimed, “Every child has lost every excuse.”

What? That’s where I have to put my foot down. That’s going a bridge too far.

I’m a big proponent of personal responsibility, but children too often don’t have a choice. They are either prisoners of their parentage or privileged by it. Some of their excuses are hollow. But other excuses are legitimate, and they didn’t magically disappear when Obama put his left hand on the Lincoln Bible.

Representative Clyburn and those like him would do well to cool this rhetoric lest the enormous and ingrained obstacles facing black children get swept under the rug as Obama is swept into power. For instance:

• According to Child Trends, a Washington research group, 70 percent of black children are born to single mothers. Also, black children are the most likely to live in unsafe neighborhoods. And, black teenagers, both male and female, were more likely to report having been raped.

• According to reports last year from the National Center for Children in Poverty, 60 percent of black children live in low-income families and a third live in poor families, a higher percentage than any other race.

• A 2006 report from National Center for Juvenile Justice said that black children are twice as likely as white and Hispanic children to be the victims of “maltreatment.” The report defines maltreatment as anything ranging from neglect to physical and sexual abuse.

Most of these kids will rise above their circumstances, but too many will succumb to them. Can we really blame them?

Malcolm Gladwell probably said it best in a November interview with New York magazine about his new book, “Outliers”: “I am explicitly turning my back on, I think, these kind of empty models that say, you know, you can be whatever you want to be. Well, actually, you can’t be whatever you want to be. The world decides what you can and can’t be.”

So black people have to keep their feet on the ground even as their heads are in the clouds. If we want to give these children a fighting chance, we must change the worlds they inhabit. That change requires both better policies and better parenting — a change in our houses as well as the White House.

President Obama is a potent symbol, but he’s no panacea.

4 Responses

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  1. Gilmour Poincaree said, on January 24, 2009 at 11:46 am

    You should work with the Censoring Bureau of the Spanish Inquisition …

  2. allisonkilkenny said, on January 24, 2009 at 2:27 pm

    Yet again, I did not write this piece. When I include a link/name before the text, that’s called a citation. In this case, Mr. Blow wrote the above piece, and here is his contact information: chblow@nytimes.com.

    Welcome to the internet.

  3. Gilmour Poincaree said, on January 24, 2009 at 5:31 pm

    As if you didn’t fully agree with it …

  4. allisonkilkenny said, on January 24, 2009 at 5:35 pm

    Sure, I do, but I felt it was a more polite reply then, “What are you talking about?”

    I’m not sure what issue you have with the article. Surely, you believe children of color should be given a fair shot at succeeding in society.

    And if you don’t, well, you’re a small-minded racist, who somehow figured out how to operate a computer.


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